Actions Speak Louder Than Words

Sixth Sunday of Easter (May 21, 2017)

Acts 8:5-8,14-17

Psalm 66:1-3,4-5,6-7,16,20

1 Peter 3:15-18

John 14:15-21

Actions speak louder than words. How many times have we heard this phrase before? It is an absolute truth in my opinion. If you say one thing, but your actions prove otherwise, you are living a lie. It’s that simple.

Another word that comes to mind is “integrity.” My definition of integrity is: doing the right thing, even when no body else is around to see it. For example, if you are at Walmart and see a man unknowingly drop his wallet in the parking lot… and you pick the wallet up but keep it for yourself because no one else saw it… you lack integrity.

This is one of the basic Christian teachings that Jesus speaks of in today’s Gospel from John. “Jesus said to his disciples: If you love me, you will keep my commandments.” In other words, Jesus is saying, “If you say you are a Christian, you should do the things I tell you to do.” Actions speak louder than words.

Being a Christian can be a struggle… I get it. Love your enemy. Pray for those who persecute you. Some of the teachings from Jesus are… let’s just call them, “challenging.” Why? Because many of our Christian beliefs go against the grain of the world. But that doesn’t make them impossible to follow or at least try.

Jesus himself knew that we would struggle in this area after he ascended to Heaven. That is the very reason he promised to give us an Advocate to be with us always. This Advocate is the third person of the Trinity, better known as the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is who guides us and strengthens us in our day-to-day lives. He’s the one who we should be relying on to help us when we have to choose between doing right or doing wrong in any given situation. And the more we choose to do right, the more He will strengthen us.

Just like an athlete training for the Olympics. If they train and eat right faithfully, they’ll perform at their best come game time. But if they cheat on their training regiment and on their diet over and over again, they will fail miserably when it really counts.

So too with us. If we consistently live out our faith in word and action, those ethical and moral challenges we will face later won’t see some overwhelming. But if we continue to choose poorly in little things, we’ll fail miserably when we are really challenged.

Hopefully I haven’t scared you by now. I’m sure there’s at least one person out there saying, “Yup, I fail daily with little things. My integrity stinks. I’m doomed.” Well chin up buttercup! Go to confession and get a fresh start. That’s the great thing about our faith. We serve a merciful God who LOVES giving us a fresh start because He is overflowing with his divine mercy. We just have to ask for forgiveness and try again. Remember, actions speak louder than words.

Love God. Learn your faith. Live out that faith. Ask the Holy Spirit for strength and guidance. It’s really that straightforward. Jesus said, “Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me. And whoever loves me will be loved by my Father.” So please, let us all show Jesus how much we love Him by learning and living out our faith more and more each day.

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Always Choose Love

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Sept 18, 2016)

Amos 8:4-7

Psalm 113:1-2,4-6,7-8

1 Timothy 2:1-8

Luke 16:1-13

Back when I was a “baby” Deacon, I would usually write out my homilies about a month in advance. That way I could fine-tune them over and over again and try to get them in my head as much as possible. That was in 2012. Now, 4 years later, I pretty much wait until a few days before I preach to put them together. I’m glad I did that this month because I had some good “homily material” happen to me about a week ago that fits perfectly with today’s reading from 1 Timothy.

For my Facebook friends out there, you may have already heard this story so please bear with me. As I was coaching my U14 soccer team last week in Lexington, I heard screaming from the field behind me so I turned to see what was going on. Apparently the referee blew his whistle for a hard foul. As the ref was reaching for his yellow card (caution), the U14 player started mouthing off to the adult referee. The referee then correctly pulled out his red card instead (ejection). At that point the head coach started screaming and had to be restrained from running out on the field by his assistant coach. Now he wasn’t screaming at his player for the foul or use of inappropriate language… No, he was screaming at the referee for ejecting his player. The referee calmly walked over to the coach and, I assume, explained the reasoning for the red card. The coach stood there long enough to listen but then quickly walked away yelling again all the way back to his bench. The coach should have been ejected but wasn’t. My point…. it’s U14 recreational soccer. These are 12-13 year old kids…. One of which committed a bad foul, then argued with the referee using disrespectful language. His coach reinforced the player’s bad behavior by acting like a screaming baby and 4 teams and all of the fans in the area witnessed it. And we wonder why there’s a shortage of referees in youth sports….

What, you may be asking, does this have to do with the reading today from 1 Timothy? Paul is asking us to pray for everyone, “that we may lead a quiet and tranquil life in all devotion and dignity.” That coach was not quiet, he was not tranquil and he was lacking in dignity at that moment. You see, being a Christian extends outside of these four walls. It’s easy to act like a “good person” when you are sitting here at church for an hour on a Saturday or Sunday. But out there in the real world is where our “Christianity” is put to the test. I have no idea if that coach was a Christian. I have no idea if he was just having a really bad day and lost it in the heat of the competition. I’ve been at that point many times in my life. Trust me. I’m no saint! But what gives us the right to act like “angels” on a Sunday in Church, but then tear into each other the other 6 days of the week?

It’s taken me a very long time to realize the root of many of our problems, in my opinion, can be traced back to one thing… anger. Paul tells us today that, “It is my wish, then, that in every place the men should pray, lifting up holy hands, without anger or argument.” Anger is a very tricky thing. It seems like so many people are full of anger these days. I mean come on… just look at the presidential race for example. It’s nothing but anger being spewed back and forth between the candidates and, unfortunately, many of their supporters. Why? It’s so much easier to hate someone than it is to love them. Love takes putting some of our own needs on the back burner while you try to help and support others. Love means being respectful of another person’s views, even if they don’t necessarily line up with your own. Love means praying for sinners rather than condemning them.

But the good news is this… loving rightly often leads to quiet and tranquility. Love leads to dignity. Love leads to peace and communication instead of arguing. And guess what?? Paul tells us in 1 Timothy that, “This is good and pleasing to God our savior, who wills everyone to be saved and to come to knowledge of the truth.” And what is that truth? Jesus Christ gave himself up as a ransom for all.

That, ladies and gentlemen, is Love.

Ok, now allow me to bring this full circle. What are we doing here in church today? We are praying and worshiping the God of the universe. We are uniting together to honor our Heavenly Father who gave us His Son…who died for our sins so that we may have eternal life. We are offering our prayers for each other and for those that are not here with us today… those who are currently outside of these walls. We are praying that all of us, along with the people “out there”, will come to feel and know the love of God in our hearts so that we will have peace.

We do this so that when we are faced with challenges “out there” we will hopefully stop and think about how we should act vs. lashing out at others with anger or frustration. By being “here” in church, we are asking God to give us the Grace to act more Christ-like “out there” in the face of sin and temptation. We are asking God to give us the restraint to not yell at the nice referee who just ejected our player for a just reason, but rather allow us to use restraint and model good behavior to all of the fans, parents and athletes watching us.

This is not easy at all. But neither was the love Jesus showed us as he hung on the cross. Loving with that intensity forces us to die to our own ways. This is painful and there’s no short cut. It is a marathon, not a sprint. A marathon that leads us to eternal love with God in Heaven.

Do not lose sight of this.

Because I don’t know about you… but I’m tired of being angry. I’m tired of being frustrated…

I desire quiet, tranquility and peace. I desire God to fill my heart completely and totally.

So please, join with me today in prayer and ask God to give all of us the grace to always choose love.

Restoring Joy to a Joyless World

3rd Sunday of Advent (December 13, 2015)

Zephaniah 3:14-18a

Isaiah 12:2-6

Philippians 4:47

Luke 3:10-18

Last Saturday, I had the opportunity to help out with the “Perryville Church Christmas Pilgrimage.” This is where we read the Nativity story from the Gospel of Luke, one section at a time at different churches in Perryville. We started at the Church of God and heard about the Annunciation. Then we went to the First Baptist church and heard of the Visitation. The next stop was our very own St. Mary’s where we heard the beautiful Scripture passage known as the Magnificat (Luke 1:46-56). This is the famous passage where Mary shouts out, “My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord. My spirit rejoices in God my Savior.” There were a total of 7 churches that participated in the pilgrimage. I was asked to give a brief reflection at St. Mary’s on the Magnificant and I wanted to share parts of it with you today… which granted, was a little intimidating to give a reflection on Mary to a room full of protestants in light of all the misconceptions that exist on our Catholic beliefs regarding Mary. So I took a deep breath and went for it…

I LOVE this time of year. When I was a child, I loved Christmas because it meant the arrival of Santa and presents. As I’ve matured in my years, and in my faith, I love Christmas because of the arrival of a baby…. the birth of our Savior, Jesus Christ. There are even times now when I get so caught up in the moment… the Christmas lights, singing carols, seeing my family all together watching a Christmas movie while eating popcorn… in these moments, I can feel the love of God so intensely that I just want to shout out with joy. This is very similar to what Mary is experiencing in her famous Magnificat from Luke’s Gospel.

Remember, Mary just had the angel Gabriel tell her, a young, unmarried virgin, that she was going to conceive God’s Son in her womb. Mary had her doubts and even questioned how this could happen…but she trusted.

Then she went to visit her cousin Elizabeth who also had experienced a miraculous conception. Elizabeth and her husband Zechariah were advanced in age and thought to have been barren. But God allowed Elizabeth to become pregnant with none other than John the Baptist; the famous New Testament prophet sent to proclaim that, “One mightier than I is coming.” Even as a fetus, John the Baptist could sense that Jesus was nearby in Mary’s womb. He got so excited that he, according to Scripture, leaped in his mother’s womb… he literally jabbed his elbow into his mother’s uterus when Mary came to visit Elizabeth.

This small “leap of faith” further confirmed in Mary’s mind that God’s plan was happening. The baby that she was carrying in her womb was about to change the world. And all of that joy, all of that love that she felt is why Mary cried out, “My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord. My spirit rejoices in God my Savior.”

Now, we as Christians know that our words and actions should be “different” from the rest of the world. We are called to reflect Jesus Christ in our kind words and loving actions to everyone we encounter and repent when we mess up. But can you imagine having so much of God’s love in your heart that your very SOUL “oozed” the love of God. My SOUL proclaims the greatness of the Lord.

You see, all of the love from the Father, all of the love from the Holy Spirit and all of the love from the baby in her womb caused Mary to explode with joy at the anticipation of Christmas…the anticipation of the birth of Jesus Christ our Savior. My spirit rejoices in God my Savior.

Why then, do I bring up the Magnificant when it’s not even in today’s Scripture readings? If you watch the news or are on social media, even for just a minute or two, you’ll see that the world is losing all joy. People are depressed, angry, scared and losing hope. We as Christians, especially during this Advent season, need to restore the joy in our world. Why? Because the birth of Jesus Christ is the ultimate love story that has the ability to restore joy and life to our world.

Here’s what I mean… Just look at some of the beautiful language that is used in today’s Scripture passages: “Shout for joy, O daughter of Zion! Be glad and exult with all your heart!” “Fear not, O Zion, be not discouraged.” “Cry out with joy and gladness.” “Rejoice in the Lord always. I shall say it again: rejoice!”

God broke into the world in the most miraculous way imaginable. God became man, through the womb of a virgin to restore hope and joy to our broken world. How appropriate because one can’t help but look at a newborn child and smile with joy.

So if you, like the crowds in today’s Gospel, are now asking, “What should we do?” I suggest that we use Mary and John the Baptist as our models and proclaim the good news with the joy that this world so desperately needs.

Allow your soul to proclaim the greatness of the Lord to all those you encounter. Allow your joy-filled spirit to rejoice in the good news of the coming of our Mighty Savior, Jesus Christ!

Room For Improvement

Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe (November 22, 2015)

Daniel 7:13-14

Psalm 93

Rv 1:5-8

John 18:33b-37

A few weeks ago, I was cleaning out our flowerbeds at home with my wife. As I was pulling some dead flowers, out of the corner of my eye I noticed a bug fell onto the back of my hand. Then I felt the sting. I yelped and danced around like a circus clown as I cursed those little flying demons we call wasps. My left hand turned red and swelled up. It hurt and throbbed the rest of the day.

That same night, I was trying to fix a tent that had a broken fiberglass pole that was snapped in half. As I was removing the pole from the tent, it slipped and I jammed the fiberglass into my right hand. Have you ever had fiberglass lodged in your body somewhere? You can’t see most of the tiny needle-like fibers in your skin, but you can most definitely feel the jabbing pain when you move the afflicted body part.

So I had a bee sting in my left hand and fiberglass in the right hand. I am a Chiropractor, which is a profession that requires me to use my hands a lot. The next day at work, every time I worked on a patient, I was very uncomfortable. However, I had a job to do so I continued on no matter how uncomfortable it made me feel.

Another one of the hats I wear is being a Catholic Deacon. It too can be uncomfortable at times. Last month I went on a retreat with all of the Catholic Deacons in our diocese. The retreat leader, Fr. Dennis, challenged us to always preach the truth, no matter how uncomfortable it makes us. Trust me, it’s so much easier to get up here and preach, “God loves you just the way you are” vs “Hey, God loves you, but to be truthful, I think we may need to change a few things.” Isn’t this what Jesus said in today’s Gospel? Jesus Christ, our King, came into the world to “testify to the truth.” Granted…I’m not Jesus Christ, but I was ordained to preach His word and help build up His Church.

So sit back, open your minds and your hearts and please allow me to challenge you a little without anyone getting offended. Deal?

Today we celebrate the feast of Jesus Christ, King of the Universe. It reminds us to evaluate our lives and see if we are truly living a life for God or are we living a life for us. To answer this truthfully, I want us to examine our commitment to our faith and see if there’s any room for improvement.

For instance, if you only give God 1 hour a week on a Sunday but ignore Him the other 167 hours in a week… there’s room for improvement. If there’s an inch of dust on your bible at home… there’s room for improvement. If you haven’t been to confession in the last month or two… there’s room for improvement. If you only put a few bucks into the church collection basket but drop hundreds of dollars on the latest and greatest gadget on Black Friday or Amazon without a second thought… there’s room for improvement. If you’re more willing to defend your political party rather than your faith… there’s room for improvement. If the only thing you have to say about Mass is that it’s “boring”… there’s room for improvement. If you can’t remember the last time your prayed without being told… there’s room for improvement. Parents, if you put more emphasis on youth sports than on attending Mass or teaching your kids the faith… there’s room for improvement. If you’ve never told anyone about Jesus Christ or His Church… there’s major room for improvement.

Listen, I’m no angel up here and I’m not trying to make you feel bad… just a little uncomfortable perhaps. As I said, it’s my job as your Deacon to challenge you a little. The last thing I want is to get up to those pearly gates and have Jesus say I was too easy on you. I can picture it now…I approach Jesus and he gives me “the look.” You know… the “I don’t care what the vegetables taste like, they are good for you so quit whining and eat them!” So I’m here to remind you that your faith is more important than vegetables or anything else this world has to offer. So quit whining and start living out your faith better!

Finding those aspects of your spiritual life where there is room for improvement is important. Why? Because your salvation depends on it! All that you have could be over tomorrow without warning. A car crash, a heart attack or as we saw on November 13, a terrorist attack. More than 120 people left their homes that day in Paris to go out on the town and have a good time. They had no idea that would be their last night on this earth.

This may sound scary and even fearful. That is the job of terrorists… to instill fear in our hearts and give up all hope. If your faith is weak and your priorities are off, they will win. If you worship the world, they will win. But if you truly worship God, if He is the center of your universe, no amount of evil can conquer you. No amount of fear will keep you away from your ultimate destination… in Heaven… with our Father.

So I ask you… at whose throne are you going to worship? The throne of the world that promotes selfishness and is filled with false pleasures or at the throne of Christ the King which is filled with eternal love, hope and salvation?

Mahatma Gandhi said, “If all Christians acted like Christ, the whole world would be Christian.” You want to change the world? I challenge you to find the areas of your life where there’s room for improvement, no matter how uncomfortable it will make you, and live in a more Christ-like manner. I say it’s about time we put the name of Christ back in Christian.

Can a Selfie Get Me To Heaven?

28th Sunday of Ordinary Time (October 11, 2015)

Wisdom 7:7-11

Psalm 90:12-17

Hebrews 4:12-13

Mark 10:17-30

We live in a very technologically advanced society. The advancements in the last 150 years have been astonishing in many areas of life. For example, there are now robotic arms that a surgeon can control remotely to perform the most detailed of operations. This is a far cry from the operating room tents during the Civil War. Where one computer used to fill up an entire room, we now have computers that fit in our hands. The days of the horse drawn carriages are over. Now we can go from 0-60 mph in a matter of seconds. We went from watching the corn grow to watching Netflix. Alexander Graham Bell made the first clear speech phone call on March 10, 1876. Now we have wireless cell phones that have cameras, wifi and ability to send text messages. And everyone seems to be “connected” through the Internet and different forms of social media like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

We don’t even need film anymore for our cameras since most things are now digital. Which makes it easy for posting things on social media! We can just take out our fancy smart phones and take a “selfie”….

selfie

…or even an “usie” (apparently this is what you call a group selfie).

 

selfie 3

selfie 2

Then we post it to Facebook or Instagram, sit back and see how many “likes” and comments we get.

These things can be good fun and can make our lives more convenient at times. But the question is, do they really matter in life? Or in other words, do they help or hinder our journey to be closer to God? I believe this is the question that Jesus is trying to get us to consider in today’s Gospel from Mark. In it, we hear about a man, who apparently had a lot of wealth, approach Jesus and ask Him the question we should all be focusing on….”What must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus refers him first to the 10 Commandments. Do not commit adultery, steal, lie or defraud and also make sure you honor your father and mother. The man eagerly replies that he has been following these rules his entire life. Jesus then gives him a challenge, “Sell what you have and give it to the poor…then come, follow me.” The rich man turned away and left sad. We are left with the impression that the man choose his material goods over eternal life.

My sisters and brothers… Jesus Christ is giving this same challenge to each one of you. I personally don’t think he wants us to deliberately be poor. But I do believe he wants us to put God before all of our material things. And if those things get in the way of God, get rid of them! If we keep putting more value on material things than on God, we’ll continue to have a messed up society where life is not valued.

In his book, “The Rhythm of Life,” Matthew Kelly had this to say about the status of our society:

“We have taller buildings, but shorter tempers; wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints; we spend more, but have less; we buy more, but enjoy it less. We have bigger houses and smaller families; more conveniences, but less time; we have more degrees, but less common sense; more knowledge, but less judgment; more experts, but more problems; more medicine, but less wellness. We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry too quickly, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too seldom, watch TV too much, and pray too little. We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and lie too often. We’ve learned how to make a living, but not a life; we’ve added years to life, but not life to years. We’ve been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor. We’ve conquered outer space, but not inner space; we’ve done larger things, but not better things; we’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul; we’ve split the atom, but not our prejudice; we write more, but learn less; plan more, but accomplish less. We’ve learned to rush, but not to wait; we have higher incomes, but lower morals; more food, but less appeasement; more acquaintances, but fewer friends; more effort, but less success. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but have less communication; we’ve become long on quantity, but short on quality. These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion; tall men and short character; steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the times of world peace, but domestic warfare; more leisure and less fun; more kinds of food and less nutrition. These are the days of two incomes, but more divorce; of fancier houses, but broken homes. These are the days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one-night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the show window, and nothing in the stockroom. Indeed it is all true.”

For far too long, we’ve put other things ahead of God and wonder why the world is so messed up. Too often these things have added convenience but also unneeded distractions to our lives. We’ve forgotten how to relax and enjoy the simple things in life. And unfortunately, we have gotten so indoctrinated with our “modernized” culture that we are now afraid to let go of our conveniences. We are afraid to let go of our “stuff” and focus on what really matters in life… being a devout Christian that isn’t afraid to live out your faith on your journey to heaven. I’m not sure who said it but, think of it this way… if you were on trial for being a Christian, would there be enough evidence to convict you?

Our Father in heaven will be the judge of that question at the moment of your physical death. He’s not going to ask you how much money you had, what kind of car your drove or how many likes you got on Facebook. He’ll judge you by the love you have for His Son and by how you expressed that love in your actions.

So, you want to know how to inherit eternal life?

Remove anything that hinders your path to heaven and put God first!

Are You Ready To Jump?

3rd Sunday Ordinary Time (January 29, 2014)

Isaiah 8:23-9:3

Psalm 27

1 Cor 1:10-13,17

Matthew 4:12-23

Three frogs were sitting on a lily pad in the middle of a large pond. After some time, all three of them decided to jump. So my question is, how many frogs were left on the lily pad? Three! You see there’s a huge difference between deciding to do something and actually doing it. 

frogs-on-a-lily-pad

So today I’ve decided that I’m going to challenge you to do something. I’ll let you think about it for a while, but ultimately you’ll need to decide to actually do it…or not. No more just sitting on the lily pad thinking about it for days on end. The time to jump is now.

So here’s my challenge. Here’s the question I want each of you to consider today. Are you a follower of Jesus? Are you one of His disciples? Now I’m sure if I asked for a show of hands as to who here was a follower of Jesus, every hand would go up. But I want you to go deeper. Simply being present here in this church today does not automatically make you a disciple. Remember, I said I wanted to challenge you.

Let’s consider what it really means to be a follower of Jesus so that you can answer my question honestly. That seems like an easy task right? Yea sure! Did you notice in Paul’s Letter to the Corinthians that the church there was fighting over this very question? There were rivalries forming and wrong teachings about Jesus being passed around which is why St. Paul wrote the letter. It’s as if he’s saying, “Listen up people, you are losing sight of what’s important. We should be united in mind and purpose. We need to focus on Jesus Christ and stop all this bickering. We need to be true to the teachings of the Son of God!”  What does this look like 2000 years later? According to a December 2011 report from the Center for the Study of Global Christianity, there are upwards of 41,000 different Christian denominations worldwide. Apparently Jesus’ followers still have trouble agreeing.

membership class

So I ask you again, what does it mean to be a follower of Jesus? Does it take wealth, fame or success in life? Hardly! The very first followers Jesus invited on His journey according to Matthew were fisherman. In the ancient world, fishermen were typically not part of the elite crowd. They were hardworking people who were not afraid to get their hands dirty. Peter, Andrew, James and John were ordinary men, who were given an extraordinary challenge from a humble teacher. They were asked to leave their steady jobs, leave their families, and become “fishers of men.” Honestly, these men probably didn’t fully understand what this phrase meant, but still they dropped their nets and followed immediately without hesitation. Now roughly 1/3 of the 7 billion people on this planet call themselves Christian and it all started with a few fishermen dropping their nets to answer a call. What safety nets are you still clinging onto? What is preventing you from following Christ without hesitation?

come-follow-me

In the Responsorial Psalm today we proclaimed, “The Lord is my light and my salvation.” But do we really mean it? Do our day-to-day actions reflect our Christian beliefs? This really hit home for me when I was ordained a deacon in 2012. During the ordination rite, Bishop Gainer handed me the Book of Gospels and said, “Receive the Gospel of Christ, whose herald you have become. Believe what you read, teach what you believe, and practice what you teach.” What are your actions teaching others?

Me holding the Book of Gospels at my Deacon ordination

Holding the Book of Gospels at my Deacon ordination

One of the great marks and curses of our faith is that Jesus doesn’t force anything on us. He allows us to freely choose what we want to do in life whether it’s good or harmful for us. He laid out His teachings for us to wrestle with and now is waiting to see what you choose. Obviously He’s hoping you will choose Him, but loves you enough to not force Himself upon you. After all, forced love is not true love. True love is doing what is right even when that means you may suffer for it. Being a disciple of Christ means being willing to lay down your life, figuratively and literally, as an act of love for Him. This is the invitation that Jesus gives all of us with the first words of His public ministry, “Repent for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” Repent simply means, “to turn.” Turn from what? Sin. He’s telling us to stop leading a life dedicated to “me” and start leading a life dedicated to “God.” Jesus opened the Kingdom of heaven for us. He is the key that unlocked the gates to everlasting life with His Father. He is the great light prophesied by Isaiah. God sent His only Son to earth out of love. Jesus’ appearance on earth was to be a wake up call for us, but are we listening?

So…are you ready to jump off that lily pad yet? Are you ready to honestly answer if you are a disciple of Christ? There’s not enough time in this short homily to discuss all of Jesus’ teachings and discern whether you are following them faithfully or not. That’s why it’s your job to read Scripture, study Sacred Tradition, and learn about the early Church Fathers, Saints and martyrs. Make studying your faith a priority for you and your family. And when doing so, remember, “believe what you read, teach what you believe and practice what you teach.”

Learn your faith. Live you faith. Jesus is asking you to be His disciple. What’s your response???

jesus with open arms